Robots

Robot of the day: September 18

“Please draw something ‘gloomy.’” After a while I turned my sketchbook around, “How about this? Although I prefer to think of this as ‘atmospheric.’” The robot considered this for a moment. “The precipitation is simply thicker atmosphere and has no practical effect.” I countered “What if you have a defective seal?” The robot just stood there, offering no reply.

Robots

Robot of the day: September 16

While they are certainly capable of constructing abstractions of their own, the robots seem to enjoy being the subjects of my drawings. “One day you’ll have to draw me,” I say. The robots look at me without saying anything. Are they gathering data? Mapping the surface of my face? Only time will tell.

Robots

Robot of the day: September 15

Upon returning from a randomized perambulation, the robot’s path was intercepted and temporarily paralleled by a cat. After a few minutes the cat angled away down an alley, where it paused, just once, to look back and momentarily regard the robot.

Robots

Robot of the day: September 12

The robots: “When we approach a familiar environment from a different vector, we must construct a new map. It is later integrated with existing data, but during mapping, what was once quantified is now unfamiliar.” “I often feel the same way,” I said.

Robots

Robot of the day: September 8, part deux

Part of the fun of tabling in an Artists’ Alley is the amazing creative energy that charges the very air. The robots had a neighbor called Ghost Cats (GhostCats.ca). This spurred a discussion amongst the robots about the nature of death and what it might mean for a robot to die. One criteria that popped up early in our discussions was that of loss of signal (LOS). Prior to catastrophic damage or failure, this LOS would prevent the transmission of data. Analogous to “brain death” in mammals.